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textiles

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Your journey will lead you to famous domestic and foreign beauty spots.

Venice

In 1516, Venice’s ruling council confined all the Jews in a small area not far from today’s train station, where there had been getti, or foundries. The gates were locked at night, and restrictions were placed on Jewish economic activities. Jews were only allowed to operate pawn shops and lend money, trade in textiles, and […]

Torino

Turin was the capital of the duchy of Savoy and later of the kingdom of Sardinia; it is now the capital of Piedmont province. The presence of Jews in Turin was recorded by Bishop Maximus in the fourth century, but thereafter no evidence of Jews exists until 1424, when the French Jewish physicians and bankers, […]

Lecce

Lecce was the capital of what was formerly known as Terra d’Otranto. It had one of the most prominent Jewish settlements in the Neapolitan kingdom before the expulsion of the Jews. Though there is no evidence of a Jewish presence prior to the 15th century, there are traces its existence Lecce at the time of […]

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Monterubbiano

Jews resided in Monterubbiano since the end of the thirteenth century, when rule over the town was disputed between the Malatesta and the Sforza families. Local Jews were involved with the manufacturing of textiles, wool and leather. The Jews lived in various parts of town, particularly in the district of St. Giovanni, St. Basso and […]

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Tolentino

The Jewish presence in Tolentino dates from the early 1300s and is tied to the trade fairs held in the city for the feast of St. Catervo, and later to those for St. Thomas and St. Nicholas. Jews were welcome at the fairs because of the goods they brought, particularly the silks, wool and leather […]

Recanati

The first mention of Jewish presence in Recanati dates back to 1337 and refers to the absolution of 20 citizens of Recanati, among them Gullielmutius Consilii Judeus, from any accusation of arson, theft, injuries, insults and murder, and all penalties incurred both financial and personal. In 14th century Civil Acts, we find a mention of […]

San Ginesio

Jewish presence in San Ginesio can be dated back to 1295, when Jews provided financing to a company involved in the wool industry. The Jews resided mainly in the Alvaneto district, which extended from Piazza dei Gentili to what is currently piazza Thomas Eskine Holland. The Jewish cemetery, called “Garden of the Jews”, was located […]

Corridonia

Throughout history this town has been known by a series of different names – including Pausula, Castello di Monte dell’Olmo, Montolmo and Castelvecchio – before finally taking up the name Corridonia, a tribute to Filippo Corridoni, a union leader active in the region before World War I.  Jews have resided in the town since 1436.  Documents attest to […]

Pesaro

Jews had settled in Pesaro by the early 15th century. Money lending to the poor was the most conspicuous, but by no means the most important, of the many activities of Jewish bankers. Jews supplied floating capital to local artisans and merchants, as well as providing financial support to farmers in anticipation of the crops. […]

Sicily

There were probably Jews living in Sicily during the period of the Second Temple. The great Jewish rhetorician Caecilius of Calacte moved from Sicily to Rome around 50 C.E. and the epigraphic records start in the third century. After this period, records are scarce. In 590, Pope Gregory the Great ordered the ecclesiastical authorities to reimburse […]

Veneto

While Jews did not settle in Venice until the 13th century, many Jewish merchants and moneylenders visited and worked in the city beginning in the 10th century. Jews were mentioned in documents from 945 and 992 that forbade Venetian captains from accepting Jews onboard their ships. In 1252, Jews were not allowed to settle in the […]